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Real-World Fuel Economy

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Real-World Fuel Economy

Post by Axle » Fri Oct 13, 2017 10:51 am

Probably the best website to really find out the gas mileage to expect out of a car is http://www.fuelly.com

I track my car there, which is a '16 Prius and over the last 30,000 miles of driving been able to average a 56.2 MPG (US) which is still better than the EPA rating by a good bit.

One thing I will say about the 4th gen Prius, whether you think they're ugly or not, they do get good gas mileage. I mean, of course if you drive them hard all the time, you probably won't see crazy awesome mileage, but that is generally speaking any car. This is a very good tool to use for researching new cars and even better used cars too.

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Re: Real-World Fuel Economy

Post by LJay » Fri Oct 13, 2017 8:33 pm

Mine gets its best mileage sitting at the curb. I try to make sure that happens a lot.

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Re: Real-World Fuel Economy

Post by Axle » Fri Oct 13, 2017 8:51 pm

LJay wrote:
Fri Oct 13, 2017 8:33 pm
Mine gets its best mileage sitting at the curb. I try to make sure that happens a lot.
Well you can't divide zero by zero now :bigsmile:

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Re: Real-World Fuel Economy

Post by LJay » Sun Oct 15, 2017 1:07 am

The car's mileage rating is ot too bad, though it is not what I would wish for. Compromise was neccessary. What is irritating is that most of my driving is short distance and in town. In order to make the best use of having a car I have to be very careful to combine trips, try to drive when there is not much stop-and-start traffic, watch the mileage meter and fret a lot in general. Makes driving no fun at all.

I am jealous of Emiliano's little burg that lets one do without a car. That would be nearly impossible here.

When the driverless car arrives and joins up with the coming blend of taxis/buses and mass transit concepts, we will be better off. That will be a while.

I read the other day that the wind energy in the North Atlantic, could be harness it, would power the entire planet. Buckminster Fuller your head around that and slip it into your Tesla.

And Axle, you should worry about ugly? Clean, cheap energy can be a beautiful thing.

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Re: Real-World Fuel Economy

Post by Axle » Sun Oct 15, 2017 8:24 am

Well no expert in city life at all. Honestly, I would probably be like a lost child at a supermarket :lol: However, I think taking trains and subways, while obviously much faster than trying to drive through times square during rush hour, probably costs quite a bit during the course of a year. Perhaps @emiliano can shed some light on that. If it weren't for paying on an auto loan I'd say the Prius is a very good choice.

As far as looks, yeah some people don't like the way a Prius looks, but eh, I think it's alright. They are mechanically quite simple, the CVT is a planetary gear set with very few moving parts, tires and maintenance is cheap and they're pretty reliable for being an electrically complex car. I don't really care so much what people think of the car I drive, as long as I like it....and that's pretty much how I have made the choices in the cars I have bought. I could have bought a Mustang but ended up buying a Challenger (and honestly probably should have got the Mustang lol...or just kept what I had), Challenger ended up not being that well built of a car. Speaking of the Challenger I could still get around 23 MPG around here which isn't bad, city mileage was terrible though. But yes, so far I have been happy with the new Prius, if there's anything more I could want it would be the Prius Prime which is the plug-in version. I want to like the Volt but GM...I really lost my faith in them after having the Pontiac and seeing the steering wheel fall off in a Chevy Cruze...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f2_b4V6C4aM

@LJay Why do you think we'll be better off with driverless cars? I mean I suppose there will be less wrecks in the end but what if I could hack a driverless car and make it go somewhere else against someone's will. I mean sure, you can jump out of the car at a traffic light or something but my thinking is once driverless cars are mainstream I think people will be taking a power nap on their commute.

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Re: Real-World Fuel Economy

Post by emiliano » Sun Oct 15, 2017 11:43 am

I didn't expect my name to come up in this thread. But I'm always happy to nerd out about the subway.

Unlike a lot of other systems, the NYC subway is not zoned, so you pay the same fare if you are going 3 stops or if you are going from one end of the city to the other. We also run 24/7, which is useful, and were the first system in the world to have both local and express tracks. So its a very efficient system for the most part.

A single ride, just a paper non refillable metrocard, costs $3.00 - nobody but tourists buys that though. The regular fare is 2.75, plus a dollar to buy a refillable metrocard itself if you don't already one. I buy the monthly unlimited, which is $121, because I usually take the subway about 20 times in a week, not including the free transfers I get between the train and the bus - that'd be another 15-20 rides if I was counting every swipe. So to keep numbers low, I'd say each week I use 35 individual rides on public transportation, so 140 per month, so I end up paying about 86 cents a ride. The longest part of my commute is going from Brooklyn to the Bronx, which I just looked up is about 15 miles. I do that 5 days a week, two times a day. So I'm easily travelling over 600 miles a month for $121 dollars. So like 5 miles per at most a dollar? *If i did my math right.

I don't know how that compares to a car, but I've done enough math for the day. Plus I don't pay car payments, parking, insurance, or maintenance. So unless you guys got your cars for free, dont have insurance, have free parking, and your car magically repairs and cleans itself, it seems like those costs should be added too. To be fair, I guess fare only covers about half the costs of operating the subway system. I'm also not sure how my numbers compares to the average NYer, I have three jobs in three different boroughs. But other people probably go out for fun more than I do, I basically just go to my jobs and go home except maybe 2 or 3 times a month when I go out with friends or whatever.

Subways use a ton of electricity no doubt, and with just under 6,000 buses (I don't know off the top of my head how many in the fleet are hybrid vs diesel vs cng) they probably cost a lot too, but on an average day about 5.7 million people ride the NYC subway, and 2.4 million ride the buses. So that cost and energy consumption is being shared by a ton of people. At least as of a couple of years ago, I remember learning that the average NYer's carbon footprint (because of reliance on public transit, smaller homes for cooling/heating) is about 30%-40% smaller than the average American's. I don't think its true anymore, but for a few years in the mid 2000's to 2010's, NYC was the greenest city in the US, which seems very counter intuitive, but was very much related to our use of public transit over personal cars.

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Re: Real-World Fuel Economy

Post by Axle » Sun Oct 15, 2017 8:10 pm

Well it would definitely sound like it is cheaper to not have a car and could easily just not be very useful. In my case, well udh, you need a car...unless you're Amish or something. I drive around 2,000 miles a month, sometimes more, sometimes less...but with car payment and insurance and cost of gas we're pushing about $0.33/mile... fuel cost is around $0.038/mile. So the lesson to be had here is you're better off with a gas guzzler car that you don't owe money on, unless you're driving a garbage truck or something...those get about 3 MPG...even semi-trucks do better (11~ MPG). Of course there are hidden costs like tires, maintenance that I'm not factoring in. I mean I'd like to think that I will keep this car until it is actually necessary to get another one. As much as I regret putting myself in this situtation fianancially, I will say you do live once and driving around in a sports car that can do 150 MPH is like no other, but the novelty does go away.

If anything I'd like to restore a classic car one of these days, just not in the near future....doesn't matter what car it is, even if you get it cheap, they're crazy expensive to restore and do it right and one that you really want to be doing most of the work.

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